Plenary Lecture

Improved Governance and Technological Innovations in Cage Culture can Enhance Sustainability of Aquaculture

Professor Neil Ridler
University of New Brunswick
Canada
E-mail: ridler@unb.ca

Abstract: Concern over negative environmental impacts of cage culture has led to boycotts, litigation and even vandalism in certain countries. One country that has avoided social unrest is Norway which is the world's largest producer of Atlantic salmon worth more than US$ 7 billion annually. Its governance of the industry ensures accountability, transparency and community participation, and has encouraged social licence. Its governance of aquaculture can be modified in other countries. A further means of inducing sustainability is technical innovation. This paper examines Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture which replicates the natural environment and can be profitable and socially acceptable.

Brief Biography of the Speaker: Educated at Oxford University and Simon Fraser University and now Emeritus Professor of Economics at the University of New Brunswick, New Brunswick, Canada, Dr. Ridler has published more than 100 refereed articles, book chapters and books. For the last twenty years much of his research has focused on the socio-economics of aquaculture. As consultant and visiting researcher at the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, his work has encompassed many countries of Africa, Asia and the Middle East.

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